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Hundreds of elephants pack their trunks as they are rehomed in new nationwide park in Malawi

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Far more than 250 elephants have been rehomed in Malawi, with the giant animals airlifted upside down as they had been moved to their new national park.

The mammoth work noticed 263 of the animals and 431 other wildlife including impala, buffalo, warthog, sable, and waterbuck transported from the Liwonde Nationwide Park in Malawi to the Kasungu Nationwide Park, 250 miles away.

The elephants had been viewed hanging upside down as they were carefully decreased into their new house as portion of the environmental task.

An elephant hangs upside down as it is airlifted to its new home in Malawi during a mammoth rehoming project that finished last week

An elephant hangs upside down as it is airlifted to its new residence in Malawi through a mammoth rehoming venture that completed previous week

More than 250 elephants have been rehomed in Malawi, with the giant animals airlifted upside down via cranes as they were moved to their new national park

Additional than 250 elephants have been rehomed in Malawi, with the big animals airlifted upside down via cranes as they have been moved to their new national park

The mammoth effort saw 263 of the animals and 431 other wildlife including impala, buffalo, warthog, sable, and waterbuck transported

The mammoth work noticed 263 of the animals and 431 other wildlife which include impala, buffalo, warthog, sable, and waterbuck transported

The giant animals were moved from the Liwonde National Park in Malawi to the Kasungu National Park, 250 miles away

The big animals were being moved from the Liwonde National Park in Malawi to the Kasungu Nationwide Park, 250 miles absent

It was carried out to maintain wholesome habitats in Malawi’s nationwide parks, build practical elephant populations and guarantee the prosperity of regional communities around the park.

The procedure took a month in overall and was concluded previous 7 days. 

The go was undertaken by Malawi’s Section of Countrywide Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) in partnership with African Parks and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

‘We are overjoyed that the exercise has been concluded correctly, thanks to all of the partners who labored hard to complete the function on time,’ stated Brighton Kumchedwa, Malawi’s Director of Countrywide Parks and Wildlife.

‘The addition of elephants and other wildlife species to Kasungu Countrywide Park will gain Malawi tourism as well as communities via task generation, thereby fuelling a conservation-pushed financial system.’

The elephants were seen hanging upside down as they were gently lowered into their new home as part of the environmental project

The elephants have been seen hanging upside down as they ended up carefully decreased into their new house as portion of the environmental task

It was carried out to maintain healthy habitats in Malawi's national parks, establish viable elephant populations and ensure the prosperity of local communities around the park

It was carried out to preserve healthy habitats in Malawi’s national parks, set up practical elephant populations and assure the prosperity of local communities about the park

The operation took a month in total and was completed last week, with hundreds of animals moved to the new park

The procedure took a thirty day period in whole and was accomplished previous 7 days, with hundreds of animals moved to the new park

The move was undertaken by Malawi's Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) in partnership with African Parks and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW)

The transfer was undertaken by Malawi’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) in partnership with African Parks and the Global Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW)

The elephant population diminished with poaching activity so this exercise hopes to see an increase in the population

The elephant inhabitants diminished with poaching activity so this exercise hopes to see an raise in the populace

After the move was completed, the herd of elephants was seen enjoying its new surroundings in the Malawi national parkl

After the shift was accomplished, the herd of elephants was noticed savoring its new environment in the Malawi nationwide parkl

Kasungu is the 2nd largest countrywide park in Malawi, covering 2,100 sq. kilometres, which is 4 occasions the sizing of the creature’s former habitat at Liwonde National Park.

‘We have been operating in close partnership with the DNPW in Liwonde to make rewards for men and women and wildlife given that 2015,’ stated Sam Kamoto, African Parks’ Place Supervisor.

‘Thanks to the Malawian Government’s determination to this landscape, Liwonde has re-emerged as a park not only hailed for the restoration of its wildlife numbers, but for its international tourism attraction.

‘The addition of elephants to Kasungu will assist with the all round tourism in the nation, add to community work, and gas a conservation-led economy.’

Kasungu is the second largest national park in Malawi, covering 2,100 square kilometres, which is four times the size of the creature's previous habitat at Liwonde National Park

Kasungu is the 2nd major national park in Malawi, covering 2,100 sq. kilometres, which is 4 periods the dimensions of the creature’s earlier habitat at Liwonde Nationwide Park

An aerial view of the elephants being airlifted into their new habitat shows the huge operation undertaken by authorities

An aerial see of the elephants becoming airlifted into their new habitat displays the substantial operation carried out by authorities

In the 1970s Kasungu was home to around 1,200 elephants but poaching saw their numbers dwindle

In the 1970s Kasungu was household to all around 1,200 elephants but poaching saw their numbers dwindle

Brighton Kumchedwa, Malawi's Director of National Parks and Wildlife, said: 'We are overjoyed that the exercise has been completed successfully, thanks to all of the partners who worked hard to finish the work on time'

Brighton Kumchedwa, Malawi’s Director of National Parks and Wildlife, mentioned: ‘We are overjoyed that the training has been accomplished productively, thanks to all of the associates who worked challenging to end the operate on time’

By 2015, there were just 49 elephants in Kasungu, making this exercise especially important in the effort to increase the population in the park

By 2015, there ended up just 49 elephants in Kasungu, creating this exercise specially vital in the work to maximize the population in the park

One of the elephants makes the most of the new surroundings after the relocation to Liwonde National Park in Malawi

1 of the elephants helps make the most of the new environment right after the relocation to Liwonde National Park in Malawi

The new surroundings should help boost elephant numbers and the animals will be monitored by authorities

The new environment should help boost elephant figures and the animals will be monitored by authorities

In the 1970s Kasungu was residence to all around 1,200 elephants but poaching noticed their figures dwindle to a stunning figure of just 49 by 2015 creating this physical exercise specifically significant in the effort and hard work to increase the inhabitants in the park.

‘The translocation of the elephants and other wildlife is a substantial achievement and proves the DNPW’s method to doing work with associates to secure its natural methods is a sound 1,’ reported Patricio Ndadzela, IFAW’s Nation Director for Malawi and Zambia.

‘The partnership with the Malawi Government is not above, IFAW will proceed to get the job done at Kasungu to be certain that the Park is absolutely restored to its previous glory.

‘We thank all partners and persons who played various roles to make sure that the workout is a success.’

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