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Leopard in Kenya gets lion to leave its tree… by pooing on it 

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Mane plops keep falling on my head: Leopard gets lion to leave its tree… by pooing on it

  • The leopard, Spot, was hiding in a boscia tree in Kenya’s Naboisho Conservancy
  • She had been enjoying an impala kill, which then attracted hyenas and lions

A leopard mum wasn’t happy about being trapped up a tree by a lion – so she pooped on it, twice.

The leopard, called Spot, had been enjoying an impala kill among the leaves of a boscia tree in Kenya’s Naboisho Conservancy.

But it soon attracted the attention of hungry lions, jackals and hyenas – with the big cats even attempting to climb up the tree.

Spot hid herself from the lions as high as possible up the tree while her one-year-old son waited in the bushes below. 

Trapped at the top of the tree, the cunning leopard thought of a way to escape and reach her baby. Lacking any other option, she pooed on the fierce predator below – successfully getting him to leave his perch. 

A leopard mum wasn't happy about being trapped up a tree by a lion - so she pooped on it, twice

This is the moment Spot the leopard pooed on a lion in the branches of the tree below

This is the moment Spot the leopard pooed on a lion in the branches of the tree below 

Spot was finally able to leave the tree and reunite with her son after the lion left its perch

Spot was finally able to leave the tree and reunite with her son after the lion left its perch

Images captured the moment the lion was defeated by a few drops of excrement falling from above.  

Wildlife photographer Paul Goldstein, who was guiding a group, documented the scene, along with guest Laura Galbraith.

Paul explained: ‘The impala kill was up a boscia tree 12 minutes from our Kicheche Valley Camp.

‘Both the leopard mother, who is called Spot, and her year old boy had been dining in the late sunshine the evening before.

‘The next morning, both animals were feeding and descended in the false dawn. But, once the mother returned to her elevated restaurant for some more venison carpaccio, she was spotted by a pair of jackals who immediately started keening. 

‘This is a high decibel call and in due course it attracted hyenas, maddened by the scent up the tree which hey could not climb.

The impala kill attracted the attentions of hungry lions, jackals and hyenas - with the big cats even attempting to climb up the tree

The impala kill attracted the attentions of hungry lions, jackals and hyenas – with the big cats even attempting to climb up the tree

Spot hid herself from the lions as high as possible up the tree while her one-year-old son waited in the bushes below

Spot hid herself from the lions as high as possible up the tree while her one-year-old son waited in the bushes below

Spot (pictured in the tree) had enjoyed dining in the sunshine the late evening before

Spot (pictured in the tree) had enjoyed dining in the sunshine the late evening before 

Spot and her son (pictured together) were separated when the band of predators took interest in the tree

Spot and her son (pictured together) were separated when the band of predators took interest in the tree

The clever animal's actions meant she was able to leap safely back to the ground

The clever animal’s actions meant she was able to leap safely back to the ground

Wildlife photographer Paul Goldstein (pictured), who was guiding a group, documented the scene, along with guest Laura Galbraith

Wildlife photographer Paul Goldstein (pictured), who was guiding a group, documented the scene, along with guest Laura Galbraith

‘Before long three large sub-adult lions appeared. They can climb, but poorly, being heavy and cumbersome, but one still tried to a cacophonous chorus from the silver-backed terrier-like jackals.

‘The leopard boy had hidden in the nearby croton bushes but the mother was marooned up the boscia and retreated to the crown to get as far away from the far bigger predator. All these adversaries are mortal enemies.

‘As the lion dropped unceremoniously from the trunk the leopard actually defecated on it. Twice!

‘The moment the lions and hyenas retreated enough the spotted cat descended and darted off toward her boy, pursued relentlessly by the jackals. Later that afternoon we found them both asleep.

‘The whole episode lasted around forty minutes and was done before 7.45am, early, just as nature intended.’

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