- Advertisement -

Putin’s cheerleaders tell him to ‘turbo charge’ his invasion and call for Russia to ‘end’ Ukraine

244

[ad_1]

Vladimir Putin‘s closest supporters are demanding he ‘turbo charges’ his invasion and totally crushes Ukraine, amid claims his brutal military campaign is failing.

TV anchorman Vladimir Solovyov – one of Russia‘s chief propagandists known as ‘Putin’s Voice’ – urged the Russian leader to speed up the invasion which is starting to show signs of making slow progress in the Donbas after months of embarrassments.

Putin’s space chief Dmitry Rogozin issued a chilling demand to ‘end’ Ukraine, while leading propagandist Dmitry Solovyov said he must take the gloves off and stop trying to protect the lives of the enemy.

Outspoken Rogozin, head of Russia’s Roscosmos space agency, posted : ‘What has emerged in place of Ukraine is an existential threat to the Russian people, Russian history, the Russian language and Russian civilisation.

‘If we don’t end them – as unfortunately our grandfathers didn’t end them – then our grandchildren will have to die, and will have to pay an even bigger price.

‘So let’s put an end to it. Once and for all. For the sake of our grandchildren.’

Head of the RT ‘propaganda’ machine Margarita Simonyan demanded harsh new firepower from Russia.

Russia1 TV anchorman Vladimir Solovyov (pictured) - known as 'Putin's Voice' - urged the Russian leader to speed up the invasion which is now making slow progress in the Donbas

Russia1 TV anchorman Vladimir Solovyov (pictured) – known as ‘Putin’s Voice’ – urged the Russian leader to speed up the invasion which is now making slow progress in the Donbas

Claiming the Ukrainians were indiscriminately bombarding ‘our Donetsk’ – the eastern Ukrainian region which has been invaded by the Russians – she said they had hit a market, maternity hospital, buildings and streets.

She demanded: ‘Mother (Russia), is it not time yet to smash these animals not by their hands, but on their jaw?’

In an extraordinary outburst, Solovyov – the host of Russia’s Channel 1 show ‘An Evening With Vladimir Solovyov’ – claimed it was Putin – not Kyiv leader Volodymyr Zelensky – ‘who is protecting the Ukrainian people’.

Some Ukrainians were ‘gnashing their teeth in hatred’ but most are ‘impatiently waiting’ for Russians to arrive, he said.

‘I hope that at some point we will switch to turbo-mode,’ he told his panellists. ‘For now we are trying to minimise not only our losses, but also the Ukrainian losses. So every day we give you [them] the opportunity to surrender, to sign the surrender.’

He claimed Zelensky was guilty of ‘ethnocide against the Ukrainian people’.

While four times missing the call up for himself, he was sending ever-older men into battle, said Solovyov.

‘Now he has …run out of men, he is going after women, right? Well done,’ he told viewers. So he wants to go down in Ukrainian history as a man who mowed down men and women. I think no one has ever made such a mockery of his own people.’

Putin has repeatedly said that the main immediate reason for his intervention in Ukraine is to protect the Russian-speakers of the east from persecution and attack.

Ukraine and its Western allies says Russia’s claim of persecution is a baseless pretext for an invasion, and that Russia is waging an unprovoked war against a sovereign state fighting for its existence.

In an extraordinary outburst, TV anchorman Vladimir Solovyov claimed it was Putin - not Kyiv leader Volodymyr Zelensky - 'who is protecting the Ukrainian people'

In an extraordinary outburst, TV anchorman Vladimir Solovyov claimed it was Putin – not Kyiv leader Volodymyr Zelensky – ‘who is protecting the Ukrainian people’

A Russian soldier walks in front of the damaged Metallurgical Combine Azovstal plant, in Mariupol, on the territory which is under the Government of the Donetsk People's Republic control, eastern Ukraine, Monday, June 13, 2022

A Russian soldier walks in front of the damaged Metallurgical Combine Azovstal plant, in Mariupol, on the territory which is under the Government of the Donetsk People’s Republic control, eastern Ukraine, Monday, June 13, 2022

Ukrainian servicemen ride American 155 mm turreted self-propelled howitzers M109, amid Russia's attack on Ukraine, in Donetsk region, Ukraine June 13, 2022

Ukrainian servicemen ride American 155 mm turreted self-propelled howitzers M109, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, in Donetsk region, Ukraine June 13, 2022

Meanwhile, Putin faced criticism from Igor Strelkov, 51, a former intelligence and army veteran who was formerly a staunchly pro-Kremlin commander of clandestine military operations during the annexation of Crimea and in Donbas in 2014.

He mocked the lack of real progress by Russian forces.

‘The second stage of the special military operation… has failed because the Donetsk group of the enemy could not be destroyed,’ he said.

‘It was only pushed back in some locations, but the advances are just tactical.’

Col. Vladimir Kvachkov, 73, an ex-Spetsnaz military intelligence commander, demanded huge mobilisation to counter the problems.

‘Without introducing martial law in Russia, and partial or better general mobilisation, there will be no strategic changes in this,’ he said. ‘I have a feeling that Citizen Putin is afraid of a mass army more than the Ukrainian [army].’

But Girkin said Russia was so badly equipped away from the front that even mobilisation would not help.

‘An attempt to conduct mobilisation, given [our] unpreparedness, may burst like a bubble in a toilet, and blow up and splatter everyone around.’ 

Putin's space chief Dmitry Rogozin (pictured left speaking with Putin on April 12) issued a chilling demand to 'end' Ukraine, while leading propagandist Dmitry Solovyov said he must take the gloves off and stop trying to protect the lives of the enemy

Putin’s space chief Dmitry Rogozin (pictured left speaking with Putin on April 12) issued a chilling demand to ‘end’ Ukraine, while leading propagandist Dmitry Solovyov said he must take the gloves off and stop trying to protect the lives of the enemy

Head of the RT 'propaganda' machine Margarita Simonyan (pictured left in 2019 with Vladimir Putin) demanded harsh new firepower from Russia

Head of the RT ‘propaganda’ machine Margarita Simonyan (pictured left in 2019 with Vladimir Putin) demanded harsh new firepower from Russia

On Tuesday, Russian forces stepped up efforts to cut off Ukrainian troops in the key industrial city of Severodonetsk in the east of the country despite Ukrainians insisting they were holding on.

Moscow has laid siege for weeks to the cities of Severodonetsk and Lysychansk, which are separated by a river, as the last areas in the eastern Donbas region of Lugansk still under Ukrainian control.

The head of Severodonetsk’s administration said ‘massive shelling’ had destroyed a third bridge linking the twin cities, but insisted his city was ‘not isolated’.

‘There are communication channels even if they are quite complicated,’ Oleksandr Stryuk told Ukrainian television. Ukraine’s ‘continue to defend the city’ but that the situation on the ground ‘changes every hour,’ he added.

On Monday, Sergiy Gaiday, governor of Lugansk, told Radio Free Europe that Russian forces had ‘destroyed all the bridges and getting into the city is no longer possible. Evacuation is also not possible’.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has branded the human cost of the battle for east ‘simply terrifying,’ urging Western allies to speed arms deliveries to shore up Ukraine’s ability to reclaim territory.

‘We just need enough weapons to ensure all of this. Our partners have them.’

His presidential advisor, Mikhaylo Podolyak, has listed hundreds of howitzers, tanks and armoured vehicles as among items needed by the Ukrainian army.

‘To end the war we need heavy weapons,’ he tweeted.

A Russian soldier speaks to foreign journalists in front of the ruined Metallurgical Combine Azovstal, in Mariupol, on the territory which is under the Government of the Donetsk People's Republic control, eastern Ukraine, Monday, June 13, 2022

A Russian soldier speaks to foreign journalists in front of the ruined Metallurgical Combine Azovstal, in Mariupol, on the territory which is under the Government of the Donetsk People’s Republic control, eastern Ukraine, Monday, June 13, 2022

A Russian soldier looks at debris of the Metallurgical Combine Azovstal, in Mariupol, on the territory which is under the Government of the Donetsk People's Republic control, eastern Ukraine, Monday, June 13, 2022

A Russian soldier looks at debris of the Metallurgical Combine Azovstal, in Mariupol, on the territory which is under the Government of the Donetsk People’s Republic control, eastern Ukraine, Monday, June 13, 2022

Last week, Ukraine’s defence minister said up to 100 Ukrainian troops were being killed and 500 sustaining injuries every day.

The capture of Severodonetsk would open the road to Sloviansk and another major city, Kramatorsk, in Moscow’s push to conquer Donbas, a mainly Russian-speaking region partly held by pro-Kremlin separatists since 2014.

An AFP new agency team in Lysychansk saw massive damage after months of shelling, with no water, electricity or phone signal.

The Ukrainian military is using high ground in the city to exchange fire with Russian forces fighting for control of Severodonetsk, just across the water.

The Lugansk governor said Ukraine’s forces had been pushed back from Severodonetsk’s centre with the Russians controlling 70 to 80 percent of the city in their attempt to ‘encircle it’.

With Russia turning the screw on Severodonetsk, Ukrainian forces have two choices: ‘to surrender or die’, said Eduard Basurin, a representative for pro-Russian separatists.

On Monday, Amnesty International accused Russia of war crimes in Ukraine, saying that attacks on the north-eastern city of Kharkiv – including banned cluster bombs – had killed hundreds of civilians.

‘The repeated bombardments of residential neighbourhoods in Kharkiv are indiscriminate attacks which killed and injured hundreds of civilians, and as such constitute war crimes,’ the rights group said in a report about Ukraine’s second-biggest city.

In Bucha, a town near Kyiv that has become synonymous with allegations of Russian war crimes, police said Monday they had found another seven bodies in a grave.

‘Several victims had their hands tied and knees bound,’ Kyiv regional police chief Andriy Nebytov said on Facebook.

Dozens of bodies in civilian clothing were found in the town in April after Russian troops withdrew from the area following a month-long occupation.

A woman crouches next to the grave of Evgeny Khrapko, a combat medic and instructor of tactical medicine who was killed on a mission, amid Russia's invasion on Ukraine, after his farewell ceremony in Kharkiv, Ukraine June 14, 2022

A woman crouches next to the grave of Evgeny Khrapko, a combat medic and instructor of tactical medicine who was killed on a mission, amid Russia’s invasion on Ukraine, after his farewell ceremony in Kharkiv, Ukraine June 14, 2022

Relatives and friends attend the farewell ceremony of Evgeny Khrapko, a combat medic and instructor of tactical medicine who was killed on a mission amid Russia's invasion

Relatives and friends attend the farewell ceremony of Evgeny Khrapko, a combat medic and instructor of tactical medicine who was killed on a mission amid Russia’s invasion

Six people were injured on Tuesday by shelling in the Russian town of Klintsy, some 30 miles from the Ukrainian border in the Bryansk region.

Regional governor Alexander Bogomaz wrote on the Telegram messaging app that the number of injured had risen to six from an earlier tally of four.

‘Those injured have shrapnel wounds,’ Bogomaz wrote. ‘They were all admitted to a local hospital. Their condition is stable.’

Reuters was unable to immediately verify the report.

Residents posted footage to social media of a Russian military helicopter hovering over the town and reported that electricity and water had been cut off.

Officials in Russian regions bordering Ukraine have in the past few weeks reported cases of what they said was cross-border shelling that damaged residential buildings and injured some people.

Separately, the defence ministry channel Zvezda News quoted Alexey Kulemzin, mayor of the separatist-controlled east Ukrainian city of Donetsk, as saying the number of people in the city killed by shelling on Monday had risen from three to six.

Away from the battlefield, Russia’s war in Ukraine has posed a threat to global food security. Ukraine’s deputy agriculture minister said Monday that a quarter of his country’s arable land had been lost but insisted national food security was not threatened.

On a farm near the southern Ukrainian city Mykolaiv, the harvest has been delayed by the need to undo damage by Russian troops who passed through the area in March.

‘We planted really late because we needed to clear everything beforehand,’ including bombshells, Nadiia Ivanova, 42, told AFP.

The farm’s warehouses currently hold 2,000 tonnes of last season’s grain but with normal export routes blocked or damaged by the war, there are no buyers for the harvest.   

[ad_2]

Source link

- Advertisement -