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Russian conscript jumps to his death after he was ordered to return to warzone

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Russian conscript, 25, jumps 100ft to his death in front of his mother after he was ordered to return to warzone – as Moscow ‘covers up’ spate of suicides

  • Mikhail Lyubimov’s mother saw him jump from a window in their tenth-floor flat
  • His death comes amid a rise in suicides that Moscow is accused of ‘covering up’

A Russian soldier in Putin’s war ‘took his own life’ by falling 100ft from a tower block a day before he was due to return to the combat zone.

Mikhail Lyubimov, 25, was seen by his mother – a cleaner in the Russian foreign ministry – jumping from a window in their tenth-floor flat, reports said.

His death comes amid a rise in suicides, which the Russian authorities are seen as ‘covering up’, linked to president Vladimir Putin’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine.

The mobilised man had suffered from ‘panic attacks’ and had started drinking over his feared return to the fighting, said his mother Natalia, 43, who works in the department of Putin’s top diplomat Sergei Lavrov.

Russian fighter Mikhail Lyubimov, 25, (pictured shortly before he was first sent to Ukraine) jumped from his tenth-floor window rather than return to fight Putin's war

Russian fighter Mikhail Lyubimov, 25, (pictured shortly before he was first sent to Ukraine) jumped from his tenth-floor window rather than return to fight Putin’s war

Mikhail Lyubimov's death comes amid a rise in suicides linked to the war which the Russian authorities are 'covering up'

Mikhail Lyubimov’s death comes amid a rise in suicides linked to the war which the Russian authorities are ‘covering up’

Thousands of Russian soldiers have called Ukraine’s ‘I want to live’ hotline

Some 6,500 Russian military personnel have surrendered to the Ukrainian government on a mobile number dubbed the ‘I want to live’ hotline.

Ukraine’s government claimed 6,543 Russian military members, many of them on the front line, called the hotline between September and January.

The hotline was established after the mobilisation of 300,000 Russian civilians in September last year.

The call centre is located in a secret location, and Russian military personnel are vetted using personal data and their service number, the Guardian reported.

Lyubimov had served as a conscript in the navy, but was drafted as a soldier into the war in Ukraine.

He died in Moscow’s southern district Tsaritsyno on his first break from the action, a day before he was due to report back for another stint on the front line.

‘Natalia said she saw her son jump out of a window of their apartment on the tenth floor,’ said a report.

‘The woman rang the police and ambulance, but the man could not be saved.’

When he was sent to fight in October, his long-term girlfriend Ksenia had posted: ‘You will return.’

Some details have emerged of other men who had taken their lives rather than fight in Putin’s war, yet there are claims that many more such cases have not been publicly revealed.

Vladimir Potanin, 46, from Kurgan, reportedly killed himself with a razor blade at a training facility in Sverdlovsk region less than one week after he was mobilised.

Another man, 28, mobilised from Shushary, Leningrad region, took his own life at a training facility in Vyborg on October 2.

Alexander Ivanov, 57, a mobilised lieutenant from St Petersburg, was found dead in Krupets village, Kursk region, before being sent to the front.

Denis R, 33, a mobilised man from Revda, Sverdlovsk region, took his own life in the Belgorod region shortly before he was due to be sent to Ukraine, it was claimed.

Reports also say that refusenik draftees are often held in makeshift prisons close to the war zones, as commanders seek to intimidate them to join the war.

Mikhail Lyubimov (pictured during compulsory military service in Sevastopol, in Russian-occupied Crimea) died in the Moscow district of Tsaritsyno on his first break from the action, a day before he was due to report back for duty on the front line

Mikhail Lyubimov (pictured during compulsory military service in Sevastopol, in Russian-occupied Crimea) died in the Moscow district of Tsaritsyno on his first break from the action, a day before he was due to report back for duty on the front line

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