- Advertisement -

Stone bridge in qualifications of Mona Lisa is uncovered as a Tuscany magnificence spot 

157

The stone bridge in the qualifications of Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa has been uncovered as a Tuscany attractiveness location.

Artwork historian Silvano Vinceti believes the overpass depicted in the 16th century painting is the Romito bridge that applied to span above the Arno River in the modest Italian village of Laterina, The Telegraph described.

He claimed to have ‘no doubt’ that he has appropriately identified the 4-arch bridge just after analysing historical documents and drone illustrations or photos, and evaluating da Vinci’s artwork to pictures of the place.

It has previously been claimed that da Vinci modelled the bridge right after structures in Bobbio and Buriano, both equally of which are in Tuscany. However, Mr Vinceti argued that neither of those people bridges had 4 arches.

Whilst it may possibly never ever be tested with certainty which bridge the Renaissance artist was intending to depict, Laterina mayor Simona Neri hopes the doable hyperlink to da Vinci will attract travellers to the village.

The bridge and cliff have been identified as the Romito bridge (top right) and these clay pinnacles ten miles away from the bridge

The bridge and cliff have been discovered as the Romito bridge (top rated suitable) and these clay pinnacles 10 miles away from the bridge

Silvano Vinceti believes the overpass depicted in the 16th century painting (right) is the Romito bridge (left) that used to span over the Arno River in the small Italian village of Laterina

Silvano Vinceti believes the overpass depicted in the 16th century painting (proper) is the Romito bridge (still left) that employed to span more than the Arno River in the modest Italian village of Laterina

Pictured: Map shows the location of the two landmarks said to be depicted in the Mona Lisa

Pictured: Map shows the site of the two landmarks explained to be depicted in the Mona Lisa

Historians think the Romito bridge, which now only has a single arch intact, utilised to function four arches – like the bridge in da Vinci’s portray.

It is suspected that the arch was seriously damaged, probably in a flood, in the the 18th century. It is described that the foundation of the alleged fourth arch can nonetheless be found in the undergrowth on the opposite side of the riverbank.

Mr Vinceti also reportedly calculated the width involving the riverbanks and the measurement of the surviving arch to establish the area would fit 4 arches.

The artwork historian included that the Romito was built between two steep cliffs, which corresponds with what is depicted in the Mona Lisa. 

The painting also reveals a curve in the river with Mr Vinceti statements matches the curve of the Arno at the Romito bridge’s place. 

‘We’re convinced as a substitute that it is the a person at Laterina,’ he said. ‘We have all the features that level to this getting the bridge portrayed in the Mona Lisa.’ 

As for the sheer-sided cliffs that surface on the still left-hand-facet of the masterpiece, just around the subject’s right shoulder, Mr Vinceti suspects that these are a cluster of eroded, clay pinnacles that nevertheless exist today in Arno’s higher valley.

They can be found about 10 miles away from the ruins of the bridge at Laterina. 

The abnormal rock formation can be observed in Higher Valdarno, a valley that develops close to the mattress of the Arno river, halfway in between Florence, Siena and Arezzo.

The stone bridge featured in the background of Leonardo da Vinci's famed Mona Lisa painting has been uncovered as a Tuscany beauty spot, an art historian alleged

The stone bridge showcased in the history of Leonardo da Vinci’s famed Mona Lisa painting has been uncovered as a Tuscany elegance spot, an art historian alleged

Pictured: The sheer stone cliffs depicted on the left of the Mona Lisa, which Silvano Vinceti has suggested are le balze dell'acqua zolfina (the crags of the sulphurous water)

Pictured: The stone bridge on the right-hand side of the Mona Lisa

Still left: The sheer stone cliffs depicted on the still left of the Mona Lisa, which Silvano Vinceti has suggested are le balze dell’acqua zolfina (the crags of the sulphurous h2o). Right: The stone bridge on the proper-hand side of the Mona Lisa

These clay pinnacles are ten miles from the Romito bridge. The unusual rock formation (called le balze dell'acqua zolfina) can be found in Upper Valdarno, a valley that develops around the bed of the Arno river, halfway between Florence, Siena and Arezzo

These clay pinnacles are ten miles from the Romito bridge. The strange rock development (called le balze dell’acqua zolfina) can be discovered in Upper Valdarno, a valley that develops all over the bed of the Arno river, halfway involving Florence, Siena and Arezzo

The formation (pictured) is known locally as le balze dell'acqua zolfina (the crags of the sulphurous water), and are understood to have been formed by erosion from a lake that drained some two million years ago

The formation (pictured) is known locally as le balze dell’acqua zolfina (the crags of the sulphurous h2o), and are comprehended to have been fashioned by erosion from a lake that drained some two million a long time ago

The development is regarded regionally as le balze dell’acqua zolfina (the crags of the sulphurous drinking water), and are understood to have been formed by erosion from a lake that drained some two million yrs back. 

In the meantime, Ms Neri hopes the discovery will convey tourists to Laterina. 

She expects the village to build a ‘friendly competition’ with other villages that have claimed to be dwelling to the Mona Lisa bridge.

The mayor needs to make guaranteed the ‘remaining arch is protected’ and told the Telegraph that ‘there are programs for a hiking path and bicycle path along the Arno River, so the bridge could be a crucial characteristic of that new route.’

- Advertisement -